SEXUAL MISCONDUCT POLICY AT COLUMBIA
SOME NEW AND OLD DOCUMENTS

A January 23 article in the student online publication Bwog sparked campus debate about Columbia's adjudication procedure for complaints of student sexual misconduct, and attracted the attention of mainstream media. Here are the Bwog article along with some reactions, as well as Columbia crime statistics for 2013.

NEW DOCUMENTS

Bwog article of January 23, 2014

Student Affairs Committee statement of January 26, 2014

President Bollinger’s statement of January 29, 2014

New York Times article of January 29, 2014

Columbia crime statistics reported under the Clery Act for 2013 (excerpted from the Public Safety 2013 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report)

OLDER DOCUMENTS:
THREE ROUNDS OF SENATE DELIBERATIONS
ON SEXUAL ASSAULT POLICY

1995

On April 28, 1995, the Senate adopted a series of resolutions presented by an ad hoc committee chaired by Sens. Martha Dore (NT, SW) and Michael Cohen (Stu., GSAS/NS). The task force defined sexual misconduct, and called for a new university-wide adjudication procedure for complaints. After a lengthy debate, including a significant dissent, the recommendations did not provide a role for counsel in the procedure. The group’s report also recommended a hot line to assist assault victims, special training for deans who handle such cases, an accessible contact person (the "gatekeeper") to process initial complaints, and wide publication of the number and outcome of these cases each year. The resolutions also called for a review of the policy in three years.

2000

On February 25, 2000, the Senate approved a series of resolutions presented, after a lengthy review, by a task force chaired by Associate General Counsel Patricia Catapano. This task force report and resolutions affirmed the earlier definition of sexual misconduct, called for a series of subcommittees of the President’s Advisory Committee on Security to review education data collection, and adjudication procedures on sexual misconduct, and offered the option of a revised alternative procedure.

2006

On February 24 and March 31, 2006, the Senate passed a series of resolutions from a task force chaired by Prof. Patricia Grieve. These recommendations also called for better education and prevention efforts, and offered some modifications of an alternative procedure. Senate debate, as in the previous reviews, focused on the question of safeguards for due process for both parties in a complaint of sexual misconduct—including the participation of counsel, as well as doubts about the effectiveness of the disciplinary procedure. One of the resolutions called for the establishment of a Presidential Advisory Committee on Sexual Assault, to take over the work of overseeing the policy.