University Senate                                                         

Proposed: January 29, 2010
Adopted: January 29, 2010 by voice vote with one nay and one abstention

 

RESOLUTION TO ESTABLISH A PROGRAM IN LEADING TO
A MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MARKETING
(GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS)

 

WHEREAS, there is a need for analytically trained marketing researchers sought by industry, consulting firms and nongovernmental organizations, and

WHEREAS, this new degree will attract those who wish to pursue a more focused course of study than that provided by the M.B.A. program and work toward a career in consulting or industry rather than academia, as well as those who wish to strengthen their credentials for entering a Ph.D. program, and

WHEREAS, such a program may appeal to foreign nationals who receive funding to study abroad but do not enroll in a degree program, and

WHEREAS, the new program will train candidates in state-of-the-art analytical research without a broad-based managerial component, and

WHEREAS, Columbia is well positioned to add this degree to its current curriculum because the Business School already has the expertise and reputation to attract a strong group of applicants, and

WHEREAS, the proposed program will not replace or duplicate any existing program, and does not rely to a significant extent on courses offered by other units of the University,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED  that the Senate establish the Master of Science in Marketing.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Education Committee shall review the program in five years.

Proponent:
Committee on Education

 


Columbia University internal approval section

PURPOSE AND NEED

1) Purpose
A) Describe the purpose of the proposed program and the professional and educational assumptions that underlie it.
In order to prevent duplication of efforts, insert here the 250 word program summary that you have prepared for the NYSED part of this proposal

Columbia Business School proposes Master of Science (MS) in Marketing program to fill the need for more analytically trained marketing researchers sought by industry, consulting firms and non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

The program will consist of 14 to 16 months of study at Columbia Business School.    Students will complete a minimum of 10 full graduate-level courses (30 credits) plus a research seminar in which they will conduct an original research project, often tied to an industry focused research question, or another approved course. 

Students will select among 3 tracks:

Elective choices will reflect these specializations. 

This new degree will be targeted to individuals that wish to pursue a more focused course of study than provided by the MBA Program and who plan to deploy their technical expertise towards a career in consulting or industry rather than towards an academic career.  These students, with academic preparation equivalent to that of students admitted to our PhD programs, wish to pursue a shorter course of study in order to better prepare them for non-academic careers.   

The program may also attract candidates interested in pursuing a PhD, who are academically prepared to do so, but do not yet have sufficient background to be admitted into a top-notch program.  The program could also appeal to foreign nationals who receive funding from their home countries to study abroad, but often spend a year in the United States taking classes without enrolling in a degree program. 

B) How does the new program relate to ongoing programs? Will it replace any existing program(s)?

This new degree will also fill a gap in the Business School’s current degree offerings by providing an opportunity for individuals to pursue a deeper, more focused course of study than provided by the MBA program.  The program will be distinct from the MBA because it will focus on training candidates to conduct state-of-the-art analytical research, but will not include a broad based managerial component.

The program will also be distinguished from the PhD program by serving those students who, in most cases, plan to deploy their technical expertise toward careers in consulting or industry, rather than careers in university teaching.

The proposed program will not replace any existing programs.

The position of this program in the intellectual life of the school may be explained as follows: Doctoral study trains students not only to solve sophisticated problems but also to select the important problems to be solved.  The MBA program trains students to create organizations and to manage them.  Our Master of Science program is designed for students who are attracted to the art and challenge of problem solving without wishing to be put in a position of having to create original research.  It will be important for the Master of Science students to complete PhD courses as, in doing so, they will be exposed to the level of thoroughness, technique, and sophistication that will be expected of them in a formal research capacity. 

 

C) Does the proposed program completely or partially duplicate (an) existing program(s) in any other unit of the University?           

The proposed program will not completely or partially duplicate any existing programs in any other part of the University.

 
D) Does the proposed program rely to a significant extent on courses that are offered by other units of the University?

The proposed program does not rely to a significant extent on courses that are offered by other units of the University.

2) Need

A) Why is the proposed program needed locally, statewide or nationally?

There is a need for more analytically trained marketing researchers sought by industry consulting firms and non-governmental organizations (NGOs).  Although Master of Science degrees in business disciplines are offered by a number of other Business Schools, and offerings in the field are expanding.  At present, Columbia is well positioned to add a Master of Science in Marketing degree to our current curriculum because the Business School already has the expertise and the reputation to attract a strong group of applicants. 

In a competitive job market landscape, the deep technical skills and expertise gained through the coursework component of a PhD program become increasingly valuable.  For academically distinguished students who wish to hone these skills, the opportunity to enroll in a Master of Science in Marketing degree will position them well for their careers.  This degree can provide students with specialized training to develop technically sophisticated solutions to business and societal problems.

 We believe that with Columbia Business School’s reputation and New York City location, we will expand the pool of interested Master of Science students rather than cannibalize the applicant pool of other schools.

 

B) Have students at the University or elsewhere requested this program? How many?
Columbia College students enrolled in the spring 2009 Introduction to Marketing class offered to undergraduates were polled about their interest in an Master of Science in Marketing program.  Of the students enrolled, more than half (approximately 35) expressed significant interest in pursuing such a program at anticipated market prices in the future if the degree were to be offered.

 

 C) If the program is career or professionally oriented, have persons in the profession or career requested establishment of the program? Have the employment needs of professionals in the field been taken into account when designing the program?

Industry Professionals who learned about the possibility of a program’s creation through informal discussions at the 2009 Sawtooth Software conference of marketing professionals (Delray Beach, FL, March 25-27, 2009) expressed great interest in hiring candidates who had completed such a course of study.  In addition, Marketing faculty often receive job and internship listings from industry contacts seeking candidates who have such a technical background, but do not necessarily hold PhDs.

 

D) What other institutions in the metropolitan area and in the Northeast offer similar programs? Have you consulted with them on the potential effect on their programs of our entry into the field?

New York:

New York University’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies offers a Master of Science in Integrated Marketing.  Because this program is not housed at the Business School at NYU, we believe that the program will not compete directly with the proposed Columbia program.

Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business also offers a Master of Science in Marketing degree, that is housed within their department of Marketing and International Business.  This program should not compete directly with the proposed program because of Columbia Business School’s reputation in the field.

Mid-Atlantic Region:

Johns Hopkins offers a Master of Science Degree in Marketing that is similar in scope to what Columbia would offer, but with Columbia’s reputation and New York City location, we anticipate expanding the pool of interested Master of Science students rather than cannibalizing Johns Hopkins’ applicant pool.

Peer Schools:

Our strongest competitor schools (Wharton, Harvard, Stanford, Kellogg, and University of Chicago-Booth, and MIT) do not currently offer competing Master of Science in Marketing programs.